About your Search

20130318
20130326
STATION
KGO (ABC) 18
LANGUAGE
English 18
Search Results 0 to 17 of about 18
. >> reporter: dan trained as a butcher, and steve, a former finance guy, started dreaming about getting a truck back in 2011. they found a used fedex truck and spent the next few months retrofitting it. threw a few test lunch-ins. >> i learned that it's crazy hot. we have to prepare and prepare. and keep preparing. >> reporter: but making it depends on more than just cooking good food. here in columbus, these newbie businessmen get support from a nonprofit development organization called ecdi. >> we have a small kitchen that rents out for $18 an hour. >> reporter: so if i own a food truck, what would be a benefit out of working out of this space? what do i get for my money? >> we help them with the marketing aspect, we help them with the social media, with food safety. we also go out and network and find them locations to do their jobs. >> reporter: there's also a secure parking lot, electric hook-ups, grease disposal and industrial-sized sinks. and for dan and steve, cash. >> don't spend more than you have to. but also make sure you pay yourself. >> reporter: having already sunk most of their
. >> steve goodman believes he has a solution. the site developed an algorhythm that evaluates resume and produces a score used to identity candidates to interview. >> over two and a half resumes. 75,000 man hours in development. took us a year and a half to get there. >> it indicates the more people that use this service, more accurate it will be in terms of predicting success between applicants and the company. there is no cost to job seekers. employers pay. this graphic design jer using bright.com. she was taken aback when asked for her graduation year and level of education. >> they discrime nate on your age. >> the ceo says applicants never need to worry it only looks at the meat of the res mai. you never have to worry about human bodies. >> a company brighten have strengths and weaknesses. >> a tech position in the bay area will score well and will find great candidates. for other industries such as agriculture won't be as well. we zront a ton of the jobs on our site. >> bright might be taking a search out of job search. in san jose, abc 7 news. >> we've got sandhya patel. >> an
much more fun to believe it. >> steve carell has been a believer all his life. >> i had a mattel magic kit when i was a kid and i performed for kids in the neighborhood. i'd put on little shows and stuff. >> jim carrey also puts on a show, conjuring up his character, rival street magician, steve gray. >> this guy is really a mess. i love the fact that i have no idea what he's going to do next. >> he's a svengali, a mind twister. that's what i loved about it. >> when you get carrey and
on the phone, as neighbors, tonight, gather in emergency shelters. and abc's steve osunsami, with our coverage of a community in crisis tonight. >> reporter: the families who lived in this large condo and apartment community in myrtle beach were just sitting down to dinner. >> i ran and started banging on doors to the buildings that were on fire. and trying to get people out. >> reporter: all of a sudden last night, a brush fire that firefighters were struggling to contain in the woods nearby was spreading to their homes. the high and dry winds helping to move the flames across a road. 26 buildings and more than 100 units were burning to the ground. and people here were running for their lives. >> by the time i got my child and my two animals out that i could save, my cousin downstairs. by the time we backed out, the condo right past me was already gone. and it was going up the back steps of mine. >> reporter: dozens of families lost everything. >> i don't know what's next. this is the first time this ever happened to me. and we just got to go step by step. the worst is when your kids look you
victory. abby and steve, you've got your work cut out for you today if you want to replace her as champion. and good luck to all three of you. here we go. the jeopardy! round, and today these categories... we'll give you the invention. for example, "pogo" would be a correct response. they're all gonna be four letters. for example, "pogo" would be a corthat's a twist. alex: lauren, where do you want to go? i'll start with someone's in the kitchen for $200. lauren. who is betty crocker? she's the one. someone's in the kitchen, $400. lauren again. who is uncle ben? right. someone's in the kitchen, $600. answer there -- the daily double. just like that -- finding it quickly. you can risk up to $1,000 though you have but the $600 at the moment. i'll do $1,000. okay, here is the clue. what is sara lee? sara lee. yes, indeed. good stuff. go again. someone's in the kitchen $. lauren. who are aunt jemima and mrs. butterworth? you got them. someone's in the kitchen, $1,000. steve. what is mrs. dash? you're on the board with $1,000. let's go -o-o for $200, please. lauren. what is the dodo? that's it
. so how much does she now get? how much of that fortune did she help build? steve osunsami on the story tonight. >> reporter: as divorces go, this one is humongous. it could split control of america's fastest growing oil company. and could lead to a record-breaking paycheck for the wife who says her husband cheated. >> this is going to be watched on main street as well as wall street and possibly internationally. because of the numbers involved. >> reporter: harold hamm is the husband in the dog house. number 35 on the forbes list of richest americans. worth $11 billion. a self-made man who started in the business scrubbing out the inside of oil barrels 50 years ago. >> and there was a lot of oil people around. i had never been around people like that. >> you wanted to be like that? >> i wanted to be like them. >> reporter: sue ann hamm is his wife of 25 years. on the table is his 68% stake in continental resources. the company she helped him build. >> the wife was a lawyer and economist. that's a bad combination for him. >> reporter: without a prenup, this becomes the bigg
restaurants are the fastest growing segment of the dining industry. dan krauss and steve concila are determined to give it a go. dan trained as a butcher. and steve, a former finance guy started dreaming about getting a truck back in 2011. in this hyper-trendy business, you've got to have an angle. for that food truck the hook is a seasonal menu from locally grown ingredients. >> spicy carrot chips. >> reporter: that doesn't just mean veggies. a farm an hour away provides meat and eggs. after all this is the midwest. >> reporter: before hitting the streets one last step. clearance from the board of health. if you think food trucks are not as heavily inspected as traditional restaurants are, you would be wrong. everything inside. >> just remember not to put any chemicals or anything above the prep area. >> reporter: and outside is closely checked. when we next catch up with that food truck three months later in october they're still learning. >> it is 100 times harder than i ever thought it would be to open up my own business. >> reporter: six months after selling their first dinn
permanent. one person in charge is steve gerl raldo this, is a second test you're going y did you feel it's necessary to do? >> so our first test was in summer months. in august. we wantedded to do a prime time test. >> you guys did a survey following a first test. what did that find? >> people were good with the first tests. 90% responded no problems. we're asking for no bikes on first three cars of the trains. that is in response to the first test. >> what have you been finding during this day? >> no major problems today. we're getting a good response and we're asking folks to go to bart.gov/bikes and let us know their experience today. >> thank you very much. this will be going on again another four days. >> all right. thank you. >> let's update the forecast. spring is here. spring is almost here and so is the rain this, is just moisture in the clouds, none of this is reaching the ground yet. tomorrow evening we're expecting the possibility of rain f you're doing traveling eureka, 54 degree was rain getting to you first. tomorrow afternoon, 55 in tahoe. 52 degrees in yosemite. 7,000 fe
potential life safer. >> later on "jimmy kimmel live". >> we have money from walking dead steve young here and jennifer like hewitt. so if you have a flat tire, dead battery, need a tow or lock your keys in the car, geico's emergency roadside assistance is there 24/7. oh dear, i got a flat tire. hmmm. uh... yeah, can you find a take where it's a bit more dramatic on that last line, yeah? yeah i got it right here. someone help me!!! i have a flat tire!!! well it's good... good for me. what do you think? geico. fifteen minutes could save you fifteen percent or more on car insurance. >> gay slur made at famous san francisco night club making news across the country. singer song writer michelle went on rant during a show last might that led more than half the audience to walk out. tonight show goers still outraged and the singer already paying appraise. john is here with the story. >> fans of my shell were simply expecting to enjoy one of the favorite singers but instead they walked out in disgust about an hour that the music. and she did something it never did before. it stopped a show. ♪
, remember moises alou and, yeah, that guy playing the role of steve barton almost, although he didn't get in the way. look who's there, moises alou. working with the d.r. general manager. bottom fifth, same score, dominican republic taking charge. sierra doubling down the left field line, carlos santana scores, man on third, jose reyes, single to center, sierra coming in to score, it's 2-1. later in the inning, dominican republic up 3-1, and adding to it, edwin encarnacion, up the middle, the run scores and dominican republic has 7-0 in the world baseball classic and will face puerto rico in the final later on tonight. that's your sports update. i'm chris hassel. have a nice day. >> all right, chris, thank you. >>> coming up next, "the pulse." is tiger woods settling down again. love is in the air, and he wants the world to know it. >>> love online. tv, the anchor pranked on her own newscast. it's a good one. for healthier, stronger, shinier hair. dare to take the pantene 5 signs challenge today. i took the dare. will you? pantene. daily moisture renewal. hair so healthy it shines. own ne
's health insurance or face a $600 penalty. abc's steve osunsami has the story. >> reporter: cvs, with nearly 200,000 workers, told everyone using their health plan they have until may 1st, 2014, to get to a doctor and measure their weight. height, blood pressure and other levels. employees who agree see no change but those who refuse will pay an extra $50 a month for health insurance. >> it's technology-enhanced discrimination on steroids. >> reporter: the critics are having a field day calling this coercion and worrying that cvs and any other company might start firing sick workers. >> the approach they're taking is based on the assumption that somehow these people need a whip. they need to be penalized in order to make themselves healthy. >> reporter: the company says this is voluntary and it never sees the test results. in an e-mail overnight they explained that their benefits program is evolving, to help our colleagues take more responsibility for improving their health and managing health-associated costs. >> the goal of these kinds of programs is to end up with a healthier
to a doctor for a health screening, or face a possible charge of $600 a year. abc's steve osunsami on the big reaction brewing tonight. >> reporter: cvs bosses aren't being shy, telling workers enrolled in their health plans to either get themselves to a doctor for a screening -- or start paying a surcharge, an extra $600 a year for their company's health insurance. >> all of the people covered under our health care will be more accountable for taking control of our health and our costs. >> reporter: body weight, blood pressure, blood sugar and cholesterol -- those are the numbers that matter. and according to company documents, if they aren't good, workers have a year to make them better, or you may have fewer health options to choose from the next time you enroll. >> the approach they're taking is based on the assumption that somehow these people need a whip, they need to be penalized to make themselves healthy. >> reporter: cc -- cvs is not alone, saying that most employers offer health assessments, and then hand out incentives to the workers who complete them. but concerned employees tell
, is it time to sell? abc's steve osunsami starts us off. >> reporter: what a turnaround. it only took ten days to sell this beautiful three-bedroom home in the middle of atlanta. there were four offers and it sold for $10,000 above asking. >> do you like this house? >> reporter: nathan and christine mayberry have been searching for a single-family home in a good school district and say there are no homes to buy. for now, they're in a cramped condo they just sold in four short days. >> the surprise is the shortage, really. i think the tables have turned now. >> reporter: on the internet, realtors like michael nevile have been screaming about this for months. >> we actually honestly have no inventory in the marketplace. >> reporter: here's a map of atlanta from zillow. look at all those homes for sale three years ago. and now today. in oakland, the average home selling in just 14 days. in st. louis, real estate agent kate burmeister is going door to door, begging families in good neighborhoods to sell. >> here's some information about the neighborhood. do you know anybody looking to buy or sell
. >> they are going on line and check boxing the jobs they want to apply for. >> steve believes he has solution. it's called bright.com, they developed an algorithm that evaluates a resume and produces a score. >> over 2 million resumes, 8.5 million job seekers, 20 million job descriptions and 75,000 man-hours development and year and a half to get there. >> it indicates that more people that use the service more accurate algorithm will be in predicting success. >> there is no cost. employer pays. >> he is a graphic designer but as an older worker she was asked for her graduation year and level of education. >> to discriminate upon your age is discriminate. >> applicants don't need to worry. >> algorithm doesn't look at the data but the meat of the resume. so therefore you never have to worry about anything like that. >> a san francisco based company it has strengthens and weaknesses. >> a tech position will score very well and score great candidates for great jobs. for other industries we don't have a ton of jobs on that site. >> so bright might be taking the search out of job search. >> katie: it
to thousands of jobs. >> steve believes he has a solution. the site developed an algorithm that evaluates your resume and produces a score employers use to identify candidates to interview. >> over 2 million resumes, 8.5 million job seekers, 20 million job descriptions, about 75,000 man hours in development and it took us about a year and a half to get there. >> they indicate the more people who use the service, the more abc news democrat it will -- the more accurate it will be. the employer pays, not the job seeker. clarissa is using bright.com for the first time. but as an older worker she was taken aback when asked for her graduation year and level of education. >> they can't discriminate upon your age or education. >> the ceo said plants don't need to worry. >> the algorithm doesn't look at that data, only the meat or the core of the resume so you don't have to look at human bias on the resume. >> bright does have strengths and weaknesses. >> a tech nation in the bay area will score well in the bay area. other areas, agriculture, it won't perform as well because we don't have a ton of jobs
for and applying to thousands of jobs. >> steve believes he has a solution. it's called bright.com. the site developed an algorithm that evaluates your resume and produces a score employers use to identify candidates to interview. >> over 2 million resumes, 8.5 million job seekers, 20 million job descriptions, about 75,000 man hours in development, and it took us about a year and a half to get there. >> bright.com indicates the more people who use the service, the more accurate it will be. that's in terms of predicting success between the appearly can't and the company. the employer pays, not the job seeker. clarissa is using bright.com for the first time. but as an older worker she was taken aback when asked for her graduation year and level of education. >> they can't discriminate upon your age or education. >> the ceo said applicants don't need to worry. >> the algorithm doesn't look at that data, only the meat or the core of the resume, so you don't have to look at human bias on the resume. >> bright does have strengths and weaknesses. >> a tech position in the bay area will score well.
. as abc's steve osunsami reports, more people are starting to put their homes on the market and for good reason. >> reporter: what a turn around. it took only ten days to sell this beautiful home in the middle of atlanta. there were four offers. it sold for $10,000 above asking. >> do you like this house? >> nathan and christine mayberry have been searching for a single family home in a good school district and say there are no homes to buy. for now in a cramped condo they just sold in four short days. >> the surprise is the shortage, really. i think the tables have turned now. >> reporter: on the internet realtors like michael neville have been screaming about this for months. >> we honestly have no inventory in the marketplace. >> reporter: a map of atlanta, look at all the homes for sale three years ago. now today. in oakland, the average home selling in 14 days. in saint louis, real estate agent, kate burmeister going door to door. begging families in good neighborhoods to sell. >> here is information about the neighborhood. do you know anybody looking to buy or sell now? >> no. >> r
'm going to let your fans ask some questions. brooklyn is in the house. >> good morning, steve phenie. do you think from the future, you'll write from the male point of view? >> think it's possible. for me, obviously, it's most natural to write from the female perspective. i have to know a character really well to the point where i'm not thinking about, what would man do. it's what would this character do. it does worry me. you don't want to get it wrong. >> jennifer, from new york. >> hi, do you have plans to produce any more movies? >> i have a little one called "austinland" that we took to sundance. making a comedy is so much fun. a couple of other thing that we're looking into right now. but it's -- it's not something i want to do instead of writing. it's something i want to do also with writing. it's a lot of fun, though. >> you don't want to limit yourself. >> why not have every creative outlet you can find. >> one more question. >> if you could be bella or melanie who would you choose? >> do i get to have bella's powers? if i never have to sleep and i'm superstrong, i'll do that on
Search Results 0 to 17 of about 18